scenic

Machine Falls

This past weekend I got the chance to meet up with a friend that was traveling from New York to Texas and show him a few waterfalls in Tennessee.

This turned out to be a much better trip than I had ever anticipated.  We've had so little rain here in the last several months I didn't really expect there to be much water anywhere.  The water level at our first waterfall, Rutledge Falls,  was OK.  It was definitely low, but it was still good.  Then we moved onto to one of my favorite falls, especially near my home, Machine Falls.  Machine Falls still had a pretty good amount of water, which made for great shooting.

I've been to and photographed Machine Falls more times than I can count.  It's always a bit of a challenge to come up with something different while I am there.  

Aperture Priority, F/16, ISO 100, 6 seconds

I tried a composition I have tried in the past, only this time I was able to do it with a very wide angle lens in the Tamron 15-30.  I basically climbed right up next to this lower fall and shoved the lens right in it's face.  Then I used a circular polarizer by Vu Filters to cut all the glare off the rocks and water.

Canon 5D III, Tamron 15-30, Vu Filters, Sirui W-2204 tripod and K-20 Ballhead

 

Portland Head Light Sunset

On our first day in Maine we stopped at The Portland Head Light to shoot sunset.  We ended up staying in Portland for the night and shot it again the next morning, too.  When capturing the sunset images I decided to walk to the opposite side of the lighthouse and see if there was anything interesting from there.  

I did find several small pools that had reflections of the lighthouse, which I may share later, but I also was able to get down right on the water.  This allowed me to capture the movement of the waves coming in and out in the foreground.

Aperture Priority, F/22, 1/2 second, ISO 100

It was still fairly bright, but I knew I wanted to get as long a shutter speed as I could so I set my aperture to F/22 and my ISO at 100.  This gave me a shutter speed of 1/2 second. That was just long enough to show movement in the waves that I was looking for.

I made this image with my Canon 5D III and Tamron 24-70 Lens.  I also used my Sirui W-2204 tripod with K-20 Ballhead. 

More Fall Color From Maine

I cannot even begin to tell you how great the fall colors were when we were in Maine for our workshop last month.  It was some of the most intense fall color I had seen in a very long time. I tried capturing it in many different creative ways.  One of those ways was to put one of the many birch trees in one half of the frame and have the fall color melt into the other half of the frame by using a shallow depth of field and a long lens.  I did this same technique for this image, but I changed the focus point to be the leaves just past the birch tree.  

Aperture Priority, F/5.6, 1/125th, ISO 800

For this image I used my Nikon D500 and Tamron 150-600 G2 Lens.  I had that setup mounted to my Sirui W-2204 tripod with K30X Ballhead.  I simply set my aperture to wide open, and being only 7 or 8 feet away from my subject, I was able to get a very shallow depth of field and isolate the leaves.

Pemaquid Point Lighthouse

One of the lighthouses along our stop up the coast from Boston to Maine was Pemaquid Point Lighthouse.  We did get to shoot this one around 9:30AM, which wasn't the best light, but not the worst either.

Pemaquid has these rocks in the foreground which make for excellent composition elements.  From the angle I shot this, there was no waves crashing onto the rocks, so I did not want to use a 10 stop ND filter here, since there really was no movement anyways.  I did use a circular polarizer, however to cut some glare off of the foreground rocks and enhance some of the colors.

Aperture Priority, F/16, 1/15th second, ISO 100

When composing This image, I simply wanted to include as much of the foreground rock as I could, so I picked a spot in the rocks that had lines that lead you into the lighthouse and jammed my lens as close to it as I could while laving the lighthouse in the upper third of the frame.  

I created this image with my Canon 5D III, Tamron 15-30mm lens and Vu Filter system.  All resting atop my Sirui W-2204 tripod.

Marshall Point Light

One of the lighthouses on our list to stop at was Marshall Point Light.  Not because it was overly beautiful or picturesque, but because it was in Forrest Gump, of course!

Marshall Point Light was in the movie Forrest Gump.  It was in the scene where Forest ran across the country.  When he ran from one ocean to another, he ended up at Marshall Point Light.

Due to our schedule we had to shoot it during the middle of the day, with not the best light.  So, I was looking for a way to present it that you don't normally see it  while trying to make the best of the light we had.

Aperture Priority, F/16, 1/125th, ISO 100, 15mm Exposure Compensation +1

Here's one of the shots I came up with.  It's from the "back" side of the walkway looking back into the sun.   I used the handrail of the walkway to diffract the sunlight in order to get the sun star.

I used my Canon 5D III and Tamron 15-30 for this shot at 15mm.  I choose F/16 as an aperture to help enhance the sun star.  Then, since I was shooting directly into the sun, I set my exposure compensation to +1.  This allowed me to get detail in the foreground and lighthouse.  If I hadn't adjusted my EC, the image out of the camera would have had very little detail in the foreground, almost a silhouette.  

Canon 5 D Mk III, Tamron 15-30, Sirui W-2204 Tripod and Sirui K-30 Ballhead

 

 

Portland Head Light

When we arrived in Boston on our way to Maine, we knew one of our first stops was going to be Portland Head Light.  In fact, we shot it once at sunset, went back the next morning for sunrise and again on our way back home when it was in immense fog.  We certainly got our chances at it, but I think sunrise offered the best opportunity.

Portland Head light is the oldest lighthouse in the state of Maine. It's also probably the most photographed lighthouse in the USA. 

Aperture Priority, F/8, 30 seconds, ISO 1250

This image was made before the sun had risen.  If you look closely you can still see several stars in the sky.  You can also see another lighthouse way off in the distance.  That is Ram Island Ledge Light, which is now a privately owned lighthouse.

I created this image using my Canon 5D III, Tamron 24-70mm Lens and Sirui W-2204 Tripod.

 

The Rock Factory

I'm finally home from another trip out west.  This time I got to visit areas that I had never visited before.  The trip took us to Zion National Park for a few days, then to Page, AZ and finally to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon.  It was a whirlwind of a trip with very little sleep, but they are always a ton of fun!

While out in Page, AZ we met up with a good friend, Stan Burman, who lives in the area and agreed to take us to a spot he shoots regularly that he calls "The Rock Factory".  The Rock Factory is actually part of the Glen Canyon National Recreational Area.  It has all kinds of interesting rock formations there that are super photogenic.  We arrived there to photograph the sunset and it did not disappoint!

Aperture Priority, F/16, 1/15th, ISO 100, Exposure Compensation +1

This is an image I made just as the sun was setting over the horizon.  I wanted to capture the starburst of the sun, so I stopped my aperture down to F/16.  Then, in order to keep the foreground from being too dark, I set my exposure compensation to +1.

The sunset turned out to be one of the best I had seen in a long time.  Stay tuned for more pictures of it!

Image made with my Canon 5D III and Tamron 15-30mm Lens.  All resting atop my Sirui N-3204X tripod and K-30X Ballhead.

 

Bluebonnets, bluebonnets, bluebonnets

You were warned yesterday that more of these were coming. ;)

This image was made in the same field as the image I posted yesterday.  This time I focused only on bluebonnets...and it seemed they went on as far as you could see.  It is very hard to see in this image, but in the background right along the horizon on the right side is a very large field of indian paintbrush flowers.  I actually drove over to check those out, but the land owner had placed private property signs up and roped off everything at the road.  So, I headed back over to this bluebonnet field.

Tech talk...I shot this at 15mm on my Sony A7R II using the Metabones adapter and Tamron Lens.  So, basically, I set the lens to 15mm and put it right at the edge of these bluebonnets at a very low perspective.  I wanted to get low for this shot.  Not too low, though.  If I had gotten much lower than this you couldn't see that the field is full of flowers.  It would have looked more like a dozen flowers than thousands.  Since the sky wasn't very interesting at all, I knew I didn't want to include much of it.  So, using my Sirui W-2204 Tripod, I positioned my camera just a bit above the tops of these bluebonnets and angled it down to exclude much of the sky.

I shot this in aperture priority mode at F/16.  I had to raise my ISO up to 800 because it was so windy.  In order to keep the bluebonnets sharp, without blur from the wind, I raised my ISO so I could get a faster shutter speed.  Between bumping my ISO and waiting on times between wind gusts, I was able to capture a few frames where there was no blur.

I'll try to give you a break from wildflowers next time.  ;)

 

Texas Wildflower Sunset

I spent last week in Texas.  While I was there, I wanted to make sure I tried my best to find a good field of the Texas state flower, the bluebonnet.  These flowers could be found most everywhere along the roadside, especially so the farther you drive away from a city, however for the area I was in finding a really large field full of flowers proved to be a challenge.  After doing a little research, I was able to locate one field that was the best of any I found in the short time I was out there.  

The only problem was it was not too far from the main highway, so when I got there, 40 of my closet friends were there already.  Many of them there to take children's portraits in the flowers, or family portraits in the flowers...one photographer had a couple pull their truck out in the field of flowers to pose with the truck for engagement photos.  So I spent a lot of time waiting on these people to move or working around them.

Now, I think a field of bluebonnets is a pretty awesome sight, but when making a photo I like to add something in the foreground as a bit of an anchor.  It doesn't have to be anything really special.  In this case I used the only handful of Indian Paintbrush Wildflowers that were in this field.  I thought the contrast of the red flowers helped to anchor the foreground a bit and also adds a bit of a leading line to the rest of the field of blue.

It was very windy during this particular sunset, so I had to bump my ISO up to get a high enough shutter speed to "freeze" the flowers, so I bumped it up to ISO 1600.  I shot this scene in aperture priority at F/16 in order to get the nice starburst.  That yielded me a shutter speed of 1/30th.  While that isn't a "fast" shutter speed, if I waited until the wind slowed a bit, it was fast enough. 

This image was made using my Sony A7R II, Metabones lens adapter and Tamron 15-30mm Lens.  I also used my Sirui W-2204 Tripod and K-20 Ballhead.  I took this tripod because it is super stable and small enough to fold up in my carry on luggage.  It worked out great!

I also processed this image using Lightroom and On1 Effects.  

Warning:  More flower images coming soon.

 

 

 

Folly Beach Pier

One of the stops on my trip along the East Coast was at Folly Beach, SC.  I went to photograph the pier at sunrise.  I always try to get to a location well in advance to give myself plenty of time to prepare and be ready for the action.  Being early....real early, enabled me to shoot some "blue hour" shots.  

Blue hour is basically like the "golden hour", only the atmosphere has a very blue tone.  It is caused by the sun being a significant distance below the earth's horizon at twilight either before sunrise or after sunset.  The indirect sunlight takes on a very blue hue.

ISO 100, 24mm, F/16 @ 20 seconds

This image was taken with my Sony A7R, Metabones Adapter and Tamron SP 24-70mm F/2.8 Di VC USD Lens.  The setup was mounted on my Vanguard Abeo Plus 323CT Tripod.