long exposure

Portland Head Light

When we arrived in Boston on our way to Maine, we knew one of our first stops was going to be Portland Head Light.  In fact, we shot it once at sunset, went back the next morning for sunrise and again on our way back home when it was in immense fog.  We certainly got our chances at it, but I think sunrise offered the best opportunity.

Portland Head light is the oldest lighthouse in the state of Maine. It's also probably the most photographed lighthouse in the USA. 

Aperture Priority, F/8, 30 seconds, ISO 1250

This image was made before the sun had risen.  If you look closely you can still see several stars in the sky.  You can also see another lighthouse way off in the distance.  That is Ram Island Ledge Light, which is now a privately owned lighthouse.

I created this image using my Canon 5D III, Tamron 24-70mm Lens and Sirui W-2204 Tripod.

 

Nubble Lighthouse

I apologize for not posting more recently, I've been so busy with personal things in the last few months.  However, I did get a break from all of that chaos and made a trip to Maine this past week.

Nature In Focus conducted a workshop in Acadia National Park and we left out a few days early to get some shooting in.  We flew into Boston and drove up along the coast attempting to photograph as many lighthouses as we could.  Since we had a lot of ground to cover, sometimes we didn't get to shoot the lighthouses in the best of light...some we actually planned to be there for at sunrise or sunset, though.

One of the lighthouses on our stop was Nubble Lighthouse, sometimes called Cape Neddick Lighthouse.  The lighthouse is located on Nubble Island which is just off of Cape Neddick Point.  The lighthouse itself is not accessible by the public, but can be viewed from the mainland.  It is also one of the last remaining lighthouses in Maine to still use a  Fresnel Lens.

This was one of the lighthouses we stopped at in the middle of the day, so light was not that great.  I wanted to try to capture an image that I would still be proud of despite the fact that I was battling the not so greatest of light.  I knew I would be trying to slow my shutter speed down to get the effect of the water and waves crashing along the shore, so I threw on a 10 stop Neutral Density filter.

Manual Exposure, ISO 125, 30 Seconds @ F/16

Here's what I came up with.

 I used my Canon 5D Mk III, Tamron 24-70mm Lens and a Tiffen 10 Stop XLE Apex ND Filter.  Of course I had to use a tripod for this shot, as the filter caused me to have a shutter speed of 30 seconds.  I used my waterproof Sirui W-2204, which worked out fabulous all week for shooting along the coast!

More Falls in The Fall

Here's another shot from last week in The Great Smoky Mountains.  The color was really nice while I was there.  These kinds of photo opportunities were plentiful along Little River Road and in the Tremont Area.

ISO 100, 15mm, F/16 @ 2 seconds

When I came upon a scene like this I tried to take the same approach to most of them.  I was using my new Tamron 15-30mm Ultra Wide angle lens.  I knew I needed to find a foreground anchor, so I usually looked for an interesting flow of water or a rock.  A foreground anchor really helps add depth to your images.  If I chose a rock, sometimes it had a nice set of fallen leaves on it, sometimes I put some leaves on it. Once I had the foreground anchored, then I made sure my composition lead you through the image to the brilliant display of fall colors in the background.   

This image was made with my Sony A7R II, Metabones Lens Adapter and Tamron 15-30 F/2.8 Ultra Wide Angle Lens.  I can;t photograph water without a circular polarizer, so I had one of those, too.  All of my gear was resting atop my Sirui W-2204 Waterproof Tripod.

Minnehaha Falls in North Georgia

Last week we had our Gibbs Garden Waterlily Workshop.  It went fantastic!  The weather was dang near perfect, the participants were amazing and the waterlilies were off the charts awesome!

I stayed over in Georgia an extra day so David and I could go shoot some waterfalls in the area.  We also had what is now dubbed "The Semi-Annual Nature In Focus Company Meeting"  to discuss plans about which workshops to include for the upcoming year.  These meetings usually start off with a vanilla pudding filled long john from Deb's Bakery in Jasper.  If they don't start that way, then they are a huge disappointment.  

We decided to head to Minnehaha Falls in North Georgia Friday morning.  I experienced a few "firsts" that morning.  It was my first trip to the falls.  It was my first time using the Tamron 15-30 Lens with a monstrous circular polarizer on the front and it was my first time putting my new Sirui R-5214X Tripod in the water.  

This Sirui Tripod is a beast!  When I say beast I mean like a beast that is big and strong, not hairy and very light to carry through the woods.  OK, seriously, it is amazing how light and easy to carry this tripod is for it's size.  

The Tamron 15-30 did not disappoint either.  It produced amazingly sharp images and I'm looking forward to getting one of my own so I can add it to the ole landscape arsenal.

ISO 100, 15mm, F/22 @ 20 Seconds

This image was made with my Sony A7R, a borrowed Novaflex Lens Adapter and a borrowed Tamron 15-30mm Lens.  All resting a top the mighty Sirui R-5214X tripod and K-40X Ballhead.

The morning was fantastic!  The clouds hung out long enough for us to capture great images, I spent some time just sitting on the rocks and letting my feet soak in the stream's cold water and I was there hanging out with a good friend.  Oh, that long john was mighty fine, too ;)