Prospect Harbor

Taking a break from lighthouses today to show you one of the harbors we visited during our Maine Workshop.

This is Prospect Harbor.  We shot this on a day that they were calling for a total rain out.  Turns out it just rained a little in the morning then it was dreary and foggy the rest of the day, so we shot all day hitting as many spots as we could that would look good in fog.  Harbors were great for this.

This spot in the harbor had all of these colorful lobster buoys, ropes and traps.  Then the boats in the background were immersed in fog.  It's like someone knew we were coming to photograph it and left all of their stuff there for us.

Aperture Priority, 16mm, F/8, 1/80th, ISO 800, Exposure Compensation +2/3

I made this image with my Nikon D500 and Tamron 16-300mm all-in-one lens.  That lens was a great choice for these harbors.  I could shot wide shots at 16mm, like this one, or zoom in and isolate one of the boats in the fog.  It was the perfect lens for his situation.

If you hover over the image you can see my camera settings for this shot.  You'll notice I added +2/3 a stop of exposure compensation.  I did this to account for the fog.  The camera will look at this scene as a whole (if you are using evaluative metering mode) and try to make it grey.  You will then need to compensate for that on your camera.  

The Boat Docks

I have returned home from our Apalachicola, FL Workshop and finally got a chance to look at a few images.

We photographed sunset at the boat docks in Eastpoint, FL on different occasions with different workshop groups.  This area offers several things that can be used as excellent foreground options.  Boats, piers, pilings and tools of the oyster trade can all be used as foregrounds for photos while the sunrises and sunsets provide colors for the sky and water.  It's an area that can be photographed at either sunrise or sunset and offers very different light during each time.

Here's an image I made at the boat docks at sunset on our last workshop day.  I was drawn to the pier and the fishing net someone had left there...probably just for me.  So, I kinda hung out here at this pier and waited for the colors to get just right.  The colors didn't disappoint.  I loved the colors and reflections, especially the reflection inside the half sunken boat.

ISO 100, 24mm, F/16 @ 0.6 seconds

I made this image using my Sony A7RII, LA-EA3 Adapter and Tamron 24-70mm Lens.  All attached to a new tripod I was trying out that I fell in love with, the Sirui W-2204. Not only did it hold the camera more stable than I could have asked, but the leg sections are sealed to make it waterproof and sand proof.  If you've ever done a shoot on the beach, you can appreciate that! 

A Two Mile Sunrise

There is a spot here in Apalachicola that is great to photograph for sunrise and sunset.  It is called Two Mile.  It got it's name because it is 2 miles from the traffic light in town.  Clever, right?  It's hard to give people directions there and tell them it's name without them thinking you are just a wise guy.

Here is a sunrise shot that I took there the other morning.  While there were no clouds to make the sky very interesting, using more of the foreground and a small Aperture, like F/22, gave me a nice starburst on the sun.

ISO 125, 15mm, F/22 @ 1/2 second

I was able to capture this image using the Tamron 15-30mm Lens that I had borrowed from my teaching partner, David Akoubian.  I also had to borrow his Nikon to E mount adapter.  Don't worry though, I had my own camera...the Sony A7Rii.  All mounted a top a fancy new tripod I am trying out, the Sirui W-2204.  It is a waterproof tripod, so it's certainly working out great while out here shooting along the coast!

Apalachicola Locals

The first of our Forgotten Coast Workshops have started this week in Apalachicola, FL.  So far we have captured great sunsets, sunrises and even some awesome milky way shots!  This morning, however, I spent a little time photographing something I normally don't....a human.

The local oyster fishermen that line the docks, fishing boats and general hangouts around town have such character.  If you take the time to listen to any of their stories you will not regret it, either.  I talked to one fella this morning that was telling me all about his family's old turpentine farm from years gone by.  Heck, we've even heard tales of a locally famous man's murder.

This morning, as we wrapped up our sunrise shoot, we ran into a few guys that were more than willing to pose for our cameras.  This gentleman was the older of them.  I do not recall his name, but I spent a few minutes talking to him and photographing him.  We tried to offer him some money for being a cooperative model for us all, but he refused to accept any payment.  

It's hard to capture the hard lifestyle these guys live through only a camera.

ISO 100, 70mm, F/2.8 @ 1/320th

I captured this image using my Sony A7RII, LA-EA3 Lens Adapter and Tamron 24-70mm F/2.8 Lens.

I processed this image using OnOne's B&W Suite.  I knew this dude would make a great black and white portrait as soon as I saw him!

 

Sunrises and Seafood

Next week I will be in Apalachicola, FL conducting two separate workshops during the week for Nature In Focus Workshops.

I am really looking forward to getting back down there.  I enjoy the area so much.  It really offers some great sunrises and sunsets, too.  I am getting to try out some new products...and there is the seafood. ;)

Here is one of the many scenes from the area.  Oyster boats at sunrise.  

ISO 100, 15mm, F/11 @ 1/15th

I took this image using a borrowed Tamron 10-24mm Lens.  It worked out wonderfully for this scene.

Oyster Boats

Sticking with the Apachicola Theme...

This was a fantastic sunrise morning to be out shooting these oyster boats!  Due to state and federal regulations, the oyster fishermen could only fish Monday-Thursday.  We knew shooting these boats on a Saturday Morning would mean a lot less traffic at the boat ramp and, aside from boats that needed maintenance, the boats would most likely all be docked since they couldn't be out fishing.

ISO 100, 15mm, F/11, 0.5 seonds

ISO 100, 15mm, F/11, 0.5 seonds

This is another image where I used the Tamron 10-24mm Lens on my Sony A7R via the Metabones Adapter.  Since the 10-24mm lens was designed for APS-C sized sensors, 15mm was about as wide as I could get on my full frame without getting some vignetting.

Antique Boats

This past weekend I got the chance to go check out an antique boat show near my home.  The whole morning it was spitting rain and overcast...you know that kind of weather photographers love but everyone else hates ;)

I knew I was going to be walking and moving around a lot so I went with my Sony A7R and Sony 24-70 F/4 Lens combination.  I went with this choice due to its' size and weight.

Here's a few images from the event.  I shot most everything in Aperture Priority Mode at a relatively large aperture, like F/4 or F/5.6 and ISO 100.

There were mostly Chris Craft Ski Boats at the event, but their were a few others.  It was a fun event to attend.

Here's one of the Chris Craft Boats.  All of them had very intricate woodworking.

Here I just tried to get as directly above the driver's seat as I could...just looking for a different angle.

Lastly, another Chris Craft.  This one had more fiberglass work than most others, but still had just enough wood for him to enter the show ;)