An Incredible Sunset

Today I am sharing another image from The Rock Factory.  Yesterday I mentioned how incredible the sunset was that evening.  It was the best I had seen in quite some time.

The Rock Factory has a bunch of these hoodoos that are very interesting.  A hoodoo is a rock formation that usually consist of soft rock topped by a harder rock that doesn't erode as easily.  The less eroded stone on top then protects the softer rock that forms the column form further erosion, too.  When you look at these formations, you think "How in the heck does that giant rock balance up there?".  That's how.  

This is such an amazing location, but despite all it has to offer the thing I enjoyed most was shooting with a few friends and avoiding the massive crowds that were at all of the popular, iconic spots.  

Aperture Priority, F/11, ISO 100, 0.4 seconds, Exposure Compensation -1EV, 15mm

These giant rocks resting on the ground made perfect foreground elements that serve a few purposes.  First, they help anchor the image, which, in turn gives the image depth.  They also, in conjunction with the hoodoo, help to lead you to the real subject...the sunset.

This image was made with my Canon 5D III and Tamron 15-30mm Lens.  This combo was mounted on my Sirui N-3204X Tripod and K-30X Ballhead.

Sunset at Cunningham Cabin

Whenever I go to the Tetons, I always try to visit Cunningham Cabin.  It seems like I generally have much better luck with sunrises than sunsets in the Tetons, but I always try to get to Cunningham Cabin for at least one sunset.

ISO 100, 35mm, F/16 @ 1/15 second

Now, I'm always a fan of the sunstars, so when I can, I usually include them.  If you want to get a nice sunstar all you have to do is shoot at a lower aperture, like F/16 or lower.  Then once you've got your aperture selected, wait for the sun to just touch the horizon.  Once it first hits the horizon you only have a matter of a couple of minutes before the ability to get that sunstar is gone.

In the old days, I used to take bracketed photos of a scene like this.  What I mean is, I would take a photo that exposes for the foreground, then I would take a photo that exposes for the background, then I would blend them together in Photoshop.  This is the same effect you would get if you were using a Graduated Neutral Density Filter in the field.  

Over the last year and a half or so I've had with my Sony A7R, I began to notice that I could just take one shot and the sensor in that camera captures so much detail, that I can pull all of the detail I need out of one picture.

I processed this image in Lightroom then jumped into On1's Perfect Effects to finish it off.  Images like this benefit greatly from the "Golden Hour Enhancer" plugin found in On1's Perfect Effect Suite.  After applying that preset, I added another one of their presets for a vignette, "Big Softy".  "Big Softy" is by far my favorite preset for a vignette, however it was a little too strong for my taste on this image.  That's ok though, because I have the ability to dial down the opacity of each preset...just like you would do in Photoshop.

The image was made with my Sony A7R, LA-EA4 Lens Adapter and Tamron 24-70mm Lens. 

Apalachicola, Florida

Short and sweet post today!  I just returned home from our Forgotten Coast Workshop in Apalachicola, FL.  The conditions were fantastic, especially for sunrise and sunset!  Some of the best I've seen!

I just wanted to share a quick image from a sunset shoot we were doing.  These are the rakes, or tongs, the oyster men use when they are out fishing.  I was kind of experimenting here a bit.  I borrowed this Tamron 10-24mm Lens designed for APS-C sensor cameras and mounted it to my Sony A7R body via a Metabones Adapter.  I quickly found out that I could get down to around 15mm without vignetting.  Anything between 10-14mm did have expected vignetting since the lens was not designed for Full Frame camera bodies.

ISO 100, 16mm, F/16, 1/5 second

ISO 100, 16mm, F/16, 1/5 second