Low ISO of 6400

I come from the school where a high ISO is 800.  Those days are long gone in these times of modern camera sensors and processors.

While I was at The Old Shelby Hotel last weekend I took the Sony A7S out.  Everyone knows how good it is at high ISOs but I still have a hard time believing it even after shooting with it for a year.

ISO 6400, 24mm, F/8.0 @ 1/125th second

Hover over the image to see camera settings used.  Click the image to view it larger.

Here's an image shot at ISO 6400.  In my mind, that's still insane.  In the Sony A7S' mind, it's just getting started.  I could've shot at even higher ISOs but I didn't need to with the available light.  I'm always impressed with how little noise there is in this camera for the ISO numbers it is shot at.

ISO 6400, 24mm, F/8.0 @ 1/60th second

Hover over the image to see camera settings used.  Click the image to view it larger.

Another image shot at ISO 6400.  This is child's play for the A7S.  It still amazes me.  Oh, another good thing a low noise monster like this is good for is astro photography.  I'll be taking it out west later this year to hopefully capture some milky way shots with it.

These images were made with my Sony A7S, LA-EA3 adapter and Tamron 24-70mm Lens.  Because of this camera's insane ability at high ISOs, there were handheld.

 

White Dome Geyser

While I was out in Yellowstone a few months back I was determined to shoot some geysers at night under the stars.

While I made made plans to do this all by my lonesome, I actually ran into a friend earlier in the day and he had mentioned he was planning to do some night geyser shooting, too.  He even mentioned the same geyser I wanted to go to, White Dome Geyser.  So later that night we met up at the geyser.

Now, shooting these starry scenes, or even the Milky Way isn't rocket science.  You have to set your camera to Manual Mode.  Start by selecting your aperture as wide open as you can get.  If your lens goes to F/4, choose that...if it goes to F/2.8, then choose that aperture.  Next set your shutter speed to 30 Seconds.  Lastly you have to adjust your ISO.  I usually start at around 1600 and adjust.  If the image needs to be brighter bump your ISO up.  If it's too bright, simply lower your ISO.  That's it!

I'll admit, though in this image I was using my Sony A7S.  It can shoot in the dark without much noise, so it's kinda like cheating.  I shoot this at ISO 5000, which is still "low" for this camera.

ISO 5000, 24mm, F/2.8 @ 30 seconds

I processed this image using Lightroom.  The new Dehaze Tool in Lightroom really made the sky pop on this image.

I mentioned I shot this with my Sony A7S, but I also used my Tamron Lenses 24-70 F/2.8 Lens.  The Milky Way was actually visible above the geyser, but I didn't have a wide enough lens to capture it all.  So I settled for the stars and glowing colors of the north.