Don't overlook the details

During my Smokies Workshop a few weeks ago, while we were waiting on sunrise, or driving around looking for wildlife, I noticed several things that would make fantastic macro images.

I wanted to share a few of the images with you and remind you not to miss the forest for the trees, as they say.  Even though I was there to shoot grand landscape style images, I was on the lookout for these little details.  

When I saw that the morning dew had covered everything in sight, then I had to get the macro lens out and take a stab at a few shots.

First it was an attempt at spiderwebs.

This was shot at a very shallow depth of field for a few reasons.  First, I wanted to blur the background to a nice blurred non-distracting background.  Second, I wanted to get those cool out of focus dew drops on the other things in the background.  Lastly, I only wanted to isolate a few of the dew drops to be tack sharp.

This was shot using my Canon 5D Mk II and Tamron SP 90mm F/2.8 Di 1:1 Macro Lens.  I stopped the lens down to F/4 to get that nice, shallow depth of field.  I shot this in Aperture Priority, so with an ISO of 100, the shutter speed was 1/160th.

Next was the dew covered dandelions.

I did something with this pic that I very seldom do...I cropped it.  I have a good reason, though.  The composition I wanted was so close that it was inside the minimum focusing distance of my lens and I didn't have my extension tubes.  So, I shot the image getting as close as I could and still focus, then cropped to get this composition.

This was shot with the same combo, the Canon 5D MkII and Tamron SP 90mm F/2,8 Di 1:1 Macro Lens.  I increased the F-Stop a bit on this one.  I set it to F/11.  Typically that is an aperture setting that would allow everything to be in focus, however depth of field is directly effected by how close we are to our subject, so even at F/11 I knew the DOF would still be very shallow.  I also shot this in Aperture Priority Mode on my Canon.  I bumped the ISO to 400 to give me a reasonable shutter speed, which was 1/160th.

Next time you are out shooting - whatever it is - don't forget to look all around you.  There may be shots everywhere!